Additional information about subdivisions of organic chemicals file:

 

Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are operationally defined as a group of synthetic organic compounds that are solvent-extractable and can be determined by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. SVOCs include phenols, phthalates, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Organochlorine compounds are synthetic organic compounds containing chlorine. As generally used, term refers to compounds containing mostly or exclusively carbon, hydrogen, and chlorine. Examples include organochlorine insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and some solvents containing chlorine.

 

Organochlorine insecticides are a class of organic insecticides containing a high percentage of chlorine. They include dichlorodiphenylethanes (such as DDT), chlorinated cyclodienes (such as chlordane), and chlorinated benzenes (such as lindane). Most organochlorine insecticides were banned because of their carcinogenicity, tendency to bioaccumulate, and toxicity to wildlife.

 

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a mixture of chlorinated derivatives of biphenyl, marketed under the trade name Aroclor with a number designating the chlorine content (such as Aroclor 1260). PCBs were used in transformers and capacitors for insulating purposes and in gas pipeline systems as a lubricant. Further sale for new use was banned by law in 1979.

 

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) make up a class of organic compounds with a fused-ring aromatic structure. PAHs result from incomplete combustion of organic carbon (including wood), municipal solid waste, and fossil fuels. PAHs include benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene.

 

Semivolatile organic compound (SVOC) are operationally defined as a group of synthetic organic compounds that are solvent extractable and can be determined by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. SVOCs include phenols, phthalates, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

 

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are organic chemicals that have a high vapor pressure relative to their water solubility, making them evaporate quickly in warm temperatures. VOCs include components of gasoline, fuel oils, and lubricants, as well as organic solvents, fumigants, some inert ingredients in pesticides, and some by-products of chlorine disinfection.